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Reblog - 93,067 notessixpenceee:

Child of Rage: A documentary about a young girl who was sexually abused when she was a year old. She has a desire to murder her entire family and carries out numerous disturbing tasks. 
The Scariest Drug in the World: Scopolamine is a drug that when taken keeps a person coherent but makes them open to follow commands. It’s been used to make people steal, as a rape drug and a way to humiliate people. It’s known as a “chemical hypnosis”. This film documents people’s experience with it.
Demonic Possession and Exorcism: The footage you are about to witness contains highly disturbing material. 
An Interview with a Cannibal: An interview with a man named, Issei Sagawa who committed a pretty horrific crime. He butchered and raped a young Dutch women because he wanted to absorb her “energy”. He spent 3 days consuming her flesh. 
The Bridge: A film on the Golden Gate Bridge, which captures the number of suicides. Many describe it as a powerful documentary, that leaves a lasting impression.
High on Crack Street: Shows just how badly crack ruins lives.  A great portrayal of the harsh, dark side of drugs. 
Aokigahara/Suicide Forest: A geologist walks through the forest and shows us what he sees. Definitly contains some depressing material.
Atomic Wounds: The effect of a nuclear weapon on a mass number of people. It’s disheartening, it’s horrifying, but it’s reality. 
Just Melvin, Just Evil: A documentary about a tormented family who suffered from sexual abuse and substance abuse because of one man. It leaves you wondering how can one man be so destructive?
Earthlings: One of the most intense documentaries made about animal abuse. Footage contains graphic material. 
Feel free to add to this list :)

lilypotterr:

Reblog - 885 notesscissorsandthread:

How To Stencil on Fabric + Elastic Waist Skirt Tutorial | Prudent Baby
Here’s a two-fer DIY for y’all - not only how to create your own flippy, comfy elastic waist skirt, but also a great how to on stenciling it! I love the Peter Pan stencil, but if it’s not your thing, you could go for hearts, geo print, stars, letters… try googling or pinteresting ‘stencilled skirt’ and get inspired!
In case anyone is having a bad night:

heythereclifford:

radiolightning:

Here is the fudgiest brownie in a mug recipe I’ve found

Here are some fun sites

Here is a master post of Adventure Time episodes and comics

Here is a master post of movies including Disney and Studio Ghibli

Here is a master post of other master posts to TV shows and movies

*tucks you in with fuzzy blanket* *pats your head*

You’ll be okay, friend <3

i will reblog this everytime it shows up because any of my followers could have a bad night right now

(via loveispomegranate)

Reblog - 5 notescussesandcuddles:

Goodbye cuddles for great-grandad Edward, in the lovely soft snow suit he and Pearl got her :)
She was wriggling far too much for his shoulders to handle bless him.

Look at how small she was last time she saw her great-grandparents in Glasgow OK I cannot handle it and I sorted out all of her newborn clothes a couple of hours ago and I think I need a good cry.
Reblog - 0 notesMy scabby child and my lovely mister

alan-rickman-for-god:

living-in-my-fantasyworld:

brenanf999:

dontwantyourmoneysir:

anndruyan:

This is a summary of college only using two pictures; expensive as hell.

That’s my Sociology “book”. In fact what it is is a piece of paper with codes written on it to allow me to access an electronic version of a book. I was told by my professor that I could not buy any other paperback version, or use another code, so I was left with no option other than buying a piece of paper for over $200. Best part about all this is my professor wrote the books; there’s something hilariously sadistic about that. So I pretty much doled out $200 for a current edition of an online textbook that is no different than an older, paperback edition of the same book for $5; yeah, I checked. My mistake for listening to my professor.

This is why we download. 

Spreading this shit like nutella because goddamn textbooks are so expensive. 

Signal Boast

BookDepository

Boundless

(via illstaytothewest)

Reblog - 792 notesmyidealhome:

personal space (via Fantastic Frank)


Nathan would love an area like this just to himself.
Reblog - 41,369 notes

bearthug:

kingahell:

kingahell:

That thing that cats do that when they are being controlled by satan.

image

imageimage

(Source: thebraavosi, via ihatealpacas-deactivated2013060)

Reblog - 180,367 notesfessyfess:

Audrey Hepburn spent many years in Africa helping the helpless. Yet all the pictures on Tumblr show her as a fashion icon. Fashion passes in a wink, compassion lasts forever.
Reblog - 75,148 notesderby-mama:

amandaonwriting:

The Disturbing Origins of 10 Famous Fairy Tales
by Emily Temple (reblogged from Flavorwire) 
Sleeping BeautyIn one of the very earliest versions of this classic story, published in 1634 by Giambattista Basile as Sun, Moon, and Talia, the princess does not prick her finger on a spindle, but rather gets a sliver of flax stuck under her fingernail. She falls down, apparently dead, but her father cannot face the idea of losing her, so he lays her body on a bed in one of his estates.Later, a king out hunting in the woods finds her, and since he can’t wake her up, rapes her while she’s unconscious, then heads home to his own country. Some time after that, still unconscious, she gives birth to two children, and one of them accidentally sucks the splinter out of her finger, so she wakes up. The king who raped her is already married, but he burns his wife alive so he and Talia can be together. Don’t worry, the wife tries to kill and eat the babies first, so it’s all morally sound.
Little Red Riding HoodIf you can believe it, the Brothers Grimm actually made this story a lot nicer than it was when they got their hands on it. In Charles Perrault’s version, included in his 1697 collection Stories or Fairy Tales from Past Times: Tales of Mother Goose, there is no intrepid huntsman. Little Red simply strips naked, gets in bed, and then dies, eaten up by the big bad wolf, with no miraculous relief (in another version, she eats her own grandmother first, her flesh cooked up and her blood poured into a wine glass by our wolfish friend).Instead, Perrault gives us a little rhyming verse reminding us that not all wolves are wild beasts — some seduce with gentleness, sneak into our beds, and get us there. The sexual undertones are not lost on us — after all, the contemporary French idiom for a girl having lost her virginity was elle avoit vû le loup — she has seen the wolf.
RumpelstiltskinThis story is pretty simple: a miller’s daughter is trapped and forced to spin straw into gold, on pain of death. A little man appears to her, and spins it for her, but says that he will take her child in payment unless she can guess his name. In the Grimm version, when the maiden finally figures out Rumpelstiltskin’s name, he reacts rather badly: ‘The Devil told you that! The Devil told you that!’ the little man yelled, and in his fury he stamped his right foot so hard that he drove it into the ground right up to his waist. Then he took hold of his left foot with both hands and tore himself in two.” Ick.
CinderellaHere, Perrault is much nicer than Grimm — in his version, the two cruel stepsisters get married off to members of the royal court after Cinderella is properly married to the prince. In the Grimm story, not only do the stepsisters cut off parts of their feet in order to fit into the glass slippers (surprise, surprise, the blood pooling in their shoes gives them away), but at the end, they have their eyes pecked out by doves. Just for good measure.
Snow WhiteFirst of all, in the original 1812 Grimm version of this tale, the evil Queen is Snow White’s actual mother, not her stepmother. We don’t know, but that makes it a lot more terrifying to us. The Disney version also left out the fact that the Queen sends the huntsman out to bring back Snow White’s liver and lungs, which she then means to eat. And the fact that she’s actually not in a deep sleep when the prince finds her — she’s dead, and he’s carting off her dead body to play with when his servant trips, jostles the coffin, and dislodges the poison apple from SW’s throat.Most notable, however, is the punishment the Grimms thought up for her. When the queen shows up at Snow White’s wedding, she’s forced to step into iron shoes that had been cooking in the fire, and then dances until she falls down dead.
Hansel and GretelThe version of the story we know is already pretty gruesome — the evil stepmother abandons the children to die in the forest, they happen upon a cannibalistic witch’s cottage, she fattens them up to eat, they outwit and kill her and escape. The Grimm version is basically the same, but in an early French version, called The Lost Children, the witch is the Devil, and the Devil wants to bleed the children on a sawhorse. Of course, they pretend not to know how to get on, so the Devil has his wife (who tried to help the poor kids earlier in the story) show them. They promptly slit her throat, steal all the Devil’s money, and run off.
RapunzelRapunzel, Rapunzel, let down your hair. Well, in the Grimm version, she does, a little too often, to a prince, and winds up pregnant, innocently remarking to her jailer witch that her clothes feel too tight.The witch, not to have any competition, chops off Rapunzel’s hair and magically transports her far away, where she lives as a beggar with no money, no home, and after a few months, two hungry mouths to feed. As for the prince, the witch lures him up and then pushes him from the window. Some thorn bushes break his fall, but also poke out his eyes. For all this extra bloodshed, however, there’s still a happy ending.
Goldilocks and the Three BearsIn this tale’s earliest known incarnation, there was no Goldilocks — only the three bears and a fox called Scrapefoot, who enters the three bears’ palace, sleeps in their beds and messes around with their salmon of knowledge. In the end, she either gets thrown out of the window or eaten, depending on who’s telling the tale. Interestingly, it has been suggested that the use of the word “vixen” to mean female fox is how we got to Goldilocks, by means of a crafty old woman in the intervening story incarnations.
The Little MermaidWe all know the story of the little mermaid: she sells her voice for a pair of legs, flops around for a bit, then wins her prince’s heart, right? Well, not exactly. In Hans Christian Andersen’s original tale, she trades tongue for legs all right, but part of the deal is that every step will be nearly unbearable, like walking on sharp swords, and the day after the prince marries someone else, she’ll die and turn into sea foam.Hoping to win the prince’s heart, she dances for him, even though it’s agony. He claps along, but eventually decides to marry another. The mermaid’s sisters sell their hair to bring her a dagger and urge her to kill the prince and let his blood drip onto her feet, which will then become fins again. She sneaks up on him, but can’t bring herself to do it. So she dies, and dissolves into foam. Later, Andersen changed the ending, so that the mermaid becomes a “daughter of the air” — if she does good deeds for 300 years, she can get a soul and go to heaven. Many scholars find this rubbish.
The Frog PrinceTraditionally the very first story in the Grimm Brothers’ collection, this story is simple enough: the princess kisses the frog, out of the goodness of her heart, and he turns into a prince. Or, if you’re reading the original version, the frog tricks the resentful princess into making a deal with him, follows her home, keeps pushing himself further and further onto her silken pillow, until finally she hurls him against the wall. Somehow, this action is rewarded by his transformation into a prince, but it’s not even the most violent. In other early versions, she has to cut off his head instead. That’s rather far off from the traditional kiss, don’t you think?

mommabroccoli:

A fuckload of classic literature:

  1. 1984 by George Orwell
  2. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
  3. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
  4. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
  5. Aesop’s Fables by Aesop
  6. Agnes Grey by Anne Brontë
  7. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Caroll
  8. Andersen’s Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen
  9. Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
  10. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
  11. Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
  12. Beyond Good and Evil by Friedrich Nietzsche
  13. Bleak House by Charles Dickens
  14. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  15. David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
  16. Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell
  17. Dracula by Bram Stoker
  18. Dubliners by James Joyce
  19. Emma by Jane Austen
  20. Erewhon by Samuel Butler
  21. For the Term of His Natural Life by Marcus Clarke
  22. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
  23. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
  24. Grimms Fairy Tales by the brothers Grimm
  25. Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift
  26. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
  27. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
  28. Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
  29. Lady Chatterly’s Lover by D. H. Lawrence
  30. Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
  31. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
  32. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
  33. Middlemarch by George Eliot
  34. Moby Dick by Herman Melville
  35. Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
  36. Nostromo: A Tale of the Seaboard by Joseph Conrad
  37. Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  38. Of Human Bondage by W. Somerset Maugham
  39. Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
  40. Paradise Lost by John Milton
  41. Persuasion by Jane Austen
  42. Pollyanna by Eleanor H. Porter
  43. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  44. Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe
  45. Sense and Sensibility, by Jane Austen
  46. Sons and Lovers by D. H. Lawrence
  47. Swanns Way by Marcel Proust
  48. Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
  49. Tender is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  50. Tess of the d’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
  51. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
  52. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
  53. The Brothers Karamazov, by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  54. The Great Gatsby
  55. The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle
  56. The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  57. The Iliad by Homer
  58. The Island of Doctor Moreau by H. G. Wells
  59. The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling
  60. The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper
  61. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
  62. The Odyssey by Homer
  63. The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood by Howard Pyle
  64. The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka
  65. The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
  66. The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James
  67. The Prince by Nicolo Machiavelli
  68. The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy
  69. The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
  70. The Tales of Mother Goose by Charles Perrault
  71. The Thirty Nine Steps by John Buchan
  72. The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Duma
  73. The Time Machine by H. G. Wells
  74. The Trial by Franz Kafka
  75. The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells
  76. Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
  77. Ulysses by James Joyce
  78. Utopia by Sir Thomas More
  79. Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
  80. Within A Budding Grove by Marcel Proust
  81. Women In Love by D. H. Lawrence
  82. Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

Click on the motherfucking Hypelinks bitches.

Here! Have a fuckload of modern literature, too!

  1. A Clockwork Orange - Anthony Burgess
  2. A Study In Scarlet - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  3. Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Hunter - Seth Grahame-Smith
  4. An Abundance of Katherines - John Green
  5. Artemis Fowl - Eoin Colfer
  6. Bossypants - Tina Fey
  7. Breakfast At Tiffany’s - Truman Capote
  8. Bridget Jones’s Diary - Helen Fielding
  9. Catcher In The Rye - J.D. Salinger
  10. Charlie And The Chocolate Factory - Roald Dahl
  11. City of Bones - Cassandra Clare
  12. Clockwork Angel - Cassandra Clare
  13. Damned - Chuck Palahniuk
  14. Darkly Dreaming Dexter - Jeff Lindsay
  15. Dead Until Dark - Charlaine Harris
  16. Ender’s Game - Orson Scott Card
  17. Everything Is Illuminated - Jonathan Safran Foer
  18. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close - Jonathan Safran Foer
  19. Fahrenheit 451 - Ray Bradbury
  20. Fight Club - Chuck Palahniuk
  21. Go The Fuck To Sleep - Adam Mansbach
  22. I Am America (And So Can You!) - Stephen Colbert
  23. I Am Number Four - Pittacus Lore
  24. Inkheart - Cornelia Funke
  25. It - Stephen King
  26. Life of Pi - Yann Martel
  27. Lolita - Vladmir Nabokov
  28. Marked - Kristin Cast
  29. Memoirs Of A Geisha - Arthur Golden
  30. My Sister’s Keeper - Jodi Picoult
  31. Never Let Me Go - Kazuo Ishiguro
  32. One Day - David Nicholls
  33. Paper Towns - John Green
  34. Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightening Thief - Rick Riordan
  35. Pretty Little Liars - Sara Shepard
  36. Slaughterhouse Five - Kurt Vonnegut
  37. Snow White And The Huntsman - Lily Blake
  38. The Book Thief - Markus Zusak
  39. The Bourne Identity - Robert Ludlum
  40. The Giver - Lois Lowry
  41. The Hunger Games - Suzanne Collins
  42. The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini
  43. The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold
  44. The Notebook - Nicholas Sparks
  45. The Outsiders - S.E. Hinton
  46. The Perks of Being A Wallflower - Stephen Chbosky
  47. The Princess Diaries - Meg Cabot
  48. The Things They Carried - Tim O’Brien
  49. The Time Traveler’s Wife - Audrey Niffenegger
  50. The Ultimate Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy - Douglas Adams
  51. Tuesdays With Morrie - Mitch Albom
  52. Uglies - Scott Westerfeld
  53. Vampire Diaries: The Awakening - L.J. Smith
  54. Water For Elephants - Sara Gruen
  55. Wicked - Gregory Maguire

Saving for later.

(Source: nachosauruz, via geekymomma-deactivated20130405)

Reblog - 220,330 notesdeath-by-lulz:

awesomephilia:
What happens when you burn a hole in a CD and blow air in it.
Via/Follow The Absolute Greatest Posts…ever.

wakenmysoul:

asexual-not-a-sexual:

Here is a brief guide to some of the important things you never learned about in sex ed. 

  • Debunking myths about anatomy 
  • Brief overview of sexuality and gender (More complex version here)
  • Slut-shaming and consent
  • Various types of birth control (with at least 95% effectiveness) 
  • Masturbation 
  • Lube
  • Sex toys

Ebook for sharing is [HERE] (I’m sorry I just really love making ebooks…)

Honestly they should use this as a guide in sex ed classes!

(via nineteenalligators)